Project information

Managing Malnutrition in West Bengal, India

Relieving the suffering of seriously malnourished children in India and working closely alongside families and the community to help prevent malnutrition from occurring again.

January 2013 - January 2014

Charity information

Child In Need India (CINI)

Child In Need India (CINI) logo
  • Need


    At least 43% of Indian Children under the age of three suffer from malnutrition. Despite the economic boom, the majority of the population is still trapped in the inter-generational cycle of poverty and malnutrition; the only solution is long-term prevention. One in every three malnourished children in the world lives in India, and these children are significantly disadvantaged due to stunting, poor cognitive development, and increased susceptibility to infections.


    CINI has set up a Day Care Nutrition Rehabilitation Centre which will offer help in the form of essential supplementary nutrition and meals. Mothers will be provided with education on nutrition and childcare. To complement this, CINI is also implementing a community-based malnutrition prevention programme - designated health workers to monitor pregnancy care and provide health and nutrition messages to ensure that during pregnancy and key life stages; early-onset malnutrition is prevented

  • Aims

    Aim 1

    Improve maternal health and child nutrition through supplementary nutrition and education.


    » Providing emergency care to children with acute malnutrition-related health problems including pneumonia, chronic diarrhoea and severe anaemia.
    » Rehabilitation of undernourished children. Monitoring pregnant and lactating women in the community and educating them on good maternal health care.

    All children admitted gain weight at a normal or increased rate, infectious diseases are treated and pregnant/lactating mothers maintain/increase weight gain as well.

    Aim 2

    Capacity-building in nutrition and health through a new Community Outreach programme.


    » Health workers visiting homes and giving advice to families on maintaining a nutritious diet with limited resources and financial constraints.
    » Training primary caregivers to maintain a healthy diet through pregnancy, early childhood and lactation for themselves and their children.
    » Training local women as community health workers to take ownership of the project and communicate the advice more effectively with their peers.

    Mothers being able to produce healthy food on a low budget, resulting in fewer cases of child malnutrition. Mothers disseminating this knowledge throughout the community.

    Aim 3

    To reduce the number of recurring cases and secondary infections.


    » Training caregivers after the initial illness to administer better nutrition and spot early signs of recurrence.
    » Regular home check-ups on vulnerable cases to ensure the mother knows about the home treatment for diarrhoea, fever and acute respiratory infections.

    Mothers knowing about home treatment for diarrhoea, fever and acute respiratory infections and being able to spot the symptoms of these conditions.

    Aim 4

    Follow-up cases to ensure that poor practices are permanently altered.


    » Supporting vulnerable cases at development milestones (first 1000 days), and undertaking regular follow-up on the health of the child and caregiver.

    Fewer secondary infections/ recurrences of malnutrition, maintaining strong links with vulnerable families in the community.

    Aim 5

    Monitoring and evaluation


    » Monitoring women and children at home with patient-retained mother and child health cards to monitor impact and progress of treatments/ training.
    » Generally improving awareness of nutrition and health knowledge in the community, this will be periodically reviewed to measure progress.

    A database will be maintained to monitor the status of 17,000 pregnant women and their children. CINI will use this information to review and improve the services it offers.

  • Impact


    The project will decrease the incidents of childhood malnutrition in West Bengal by engaging the community in better nutritional practices and treating patients effectively. Success will be illustrated by encouraging the community to become stakeholders and eventually take over the project. This will encourage better dissemination of knowledge as grassroots communication is infinitely more effective. The model will also be replicable for other states in India with similar community practices.


    The main risk is a shortage of funding and/or staff to carry out the project. We have dealt with this by applying to a wide variety of funders and encouraging them to commit to a longer-term funding strategy dependent upon continual evaluation. There is also the risk that CINI will lose touch with the families it monitors, given the lack of electronic communication . We have dealt with this by forging strong links with the communities we work with and asking participants to become stakeholders.


    Donors can receive a six month report detailing ongoing and forthcoming activities and any changes that have been made to the project plans. At the end of the year donors will also receive, on request, an annual report. Our website, social media and news letters are also regularly updated.

  • Budget

    Budget - Project Cost: £17,037

    Loading graph....
      Amount Heading Description
      £1,024 Administration Including Travel
      £5,429 Personnel Staff costs
      £1,429 Nutritional Food Supplements Nutrimix, food for treating malnutrition
      £4,274 Capacity Building and Support Health Assistants, Training, Community Engagement, Monitoring, Clinical records, Support Staff etc.
      £4,881 Monitoring and Supervision Cost of Identifying and supervising new mothers n the community.
  • Background


    The project will cover the area of Mallickpur, which is an area North East of Kolkata on the borders of Bangladesh.

    The agricultural ouput in recent years has been severely diminished and water supplies have dried up, leaving residents trapped in a cycle of poverty with limited resources and capacity to progress. in this climate, malnutrition is thriving.


    270 mothers will benefit. We will make sure they receive antenatal and postnatal support, support with transport to the hospital, help with the immunisation of their child, education in malnutrition issues and
    safe infant care as well as sensitisation for women's families on the the same issues.

    800 children under 14 will directly benefit from support with malnutrition issues.

  • Why Us?

    Why Us?

    A community-led NGO with over 30 years experience & a wealth of local knowledge. CINI has worked in malnutrition since its inception and its model of management has been taken on by the Indian Government and replicated in other states. CINI is a pioneer of the latest technology and academia in the field of malnutrition, it is the only NGO to have won the Indian National Award for Child Welfare twice. In 2012 CINI was award the World Health Organisation award for Excellence in Primary Health Care

    Read more about the Charity running this project.


    Dr Samir Chaudhuri

    Dr Samir is CINI's founder, he is a Paediatrician who specialises in child nutrition and has a strong academic history in the field.

CINI's rehabilitation of malnourished children

CINI's rehabilitation of malnourished children

When I came to CINI it really changed both my sons and my life. He was suffering…but now the situation is much better.

Debika Par - A young mother whose son Jeet was treated at CINI's Nutrition Rehabilitation Centre last year