Project information

Research safer treatments for Children's Cancer

We are dedicated to finding safe new treatments for children diagnosed with cancer. 1 in 500 children will be diagnosed with cancer before they are 14. Of these 60% will suffer devastating late effects from the very treatment used to save them. Help us to ensure every child can survive & thrive.

Continuing until safer treatments are found

Charity information: Kidscan Children's Cancer Research

Kidscan Children's Cancer Research logo
  • Need

    Need

    Since 1950 only 3 new cancer treatments have been sourced that are dedicated for children. The majority of current treatments are watered down versions of adult drugs. These are too harsh for children's bodies, killing too many developing cells and leaving the child with devastating life long side effects, such as infertility, mobility issues and bone growth deficiencies. We aim to develop targeted therapies, safer for children's developing bodies.

    Solution

    We fund research applications into specific research projects to find safe new treatments. Since 2014 we've funded over 50 research projects. We focus on targeted treatments to treat specific cancers in children. We also aim to improve current treatments to eliminate side effects. We receive no statutory funding and so funding this project allows us to continue this vital research. Our aim is to reach a stage where every child diagnosed with cancer can survive and thrive.

  • Aims

    Aim 1

    To ensure every child diagnosed with cancer can survive and thrive.


    Activities

    » Fund research to find safer treatments for children diagnosed with cancer.

    What success will look like

    To reduce the statistic that 60% of children diagnosed with cancer suffer damaging late effects.


  • Impact

    Impact

    Since 1950 only 3 new drugs have been developed specifically for children with cancer. We want to change this. Long term, we aim to make current treatments safer as well as introducing new treatments. Our research will ensure that those who survive can go onto live long lives following cancer. As opposed to being left with long life debilitating side effects.

    Risk

    To ensure we meet our aim, we need quality research application proposals. We have identified several publications directed at the scientific community to promote our application process as well as building our profile as a charity. We aim to increase applications by advertising in this way. We also face risks from larger competitors in the charitable market, for example CRUK. We are building our local networks as well as raising awareness to ensure we can continue to receive vital donations.

    Reporting

    We will send them e-updates, sign them up to our newsletter and update those who do not wish to be communicated directly with regular blog and social media posts.

  • Budget

    Budget - Project Cost: £4,000

    Loading graph....
      Amount Heading Description
      £525 PhD Student Fund a PhD student for 1 week
      £2,626 Senior Research Scientist Fund a Senior Research Scientist for 1 week
      £849 Research Equipment The costs of equipment associated with the funding of the PhD student and Senior Research Scientist
  • Background

    Location

    University of Salford
    Cockcroft Building
    Salford
    M5 4NT

    Beneficiaries

    Children diagnosed with cancer

  • Why Us?

    Why Us?

    We are a formal partner of the national NIHR Clinical Research Network which provides a national framework to support efficient delivery of research in the NHS; we are also part of the Accelerating Paediatric Oncology Drug Development collaboration which is a patient-led group of industrial and scientific experts working to bridge gaps that hinder children’s cancer drug treatment.

    Read more about the Charity running this project.

    People

    Dr David Pye

    Academic Lead, Chemical Sciences, Reader in Molecular Bioscience University of Salford. Dr Pye is also our Scientific Director.

£10

£10 will pay for an hour's worth of research.

'Help me fight the monster in my tummy'

Archie Hill