Project information

Reforestation in the Tropical Andes, Peru

The Tropical Andes Biodiversity Hotspot is the most biologically diverse region on Earth with some 15,000 endemic plant & 75 endemic mammal species, one of them the Critically Endangered yellow tailed woolly monkey. With the help of local people we are creating protected & reforestation buffer zones

Around 3 years

Charity information: Neotropical Primate Conservation

Neotropical Primate Conservation logo
  • Need

    Need

    The Tropical Andes Biodiversity Hotspot is one of the most threatened ecosystems in the world due to rapid human population growth and high levels of deforestation. Less than 25% of this hotspot’s original area is still available habitat for wildlife. The human populations in La Esperanza and neighbouring communities suffer from severe poverty. Environmental problems include localised climate changes, impoverishment of soils, landslides & growing scarcity of natural resources like wood & water.

    Solution

    Reforestation themes include enrichment planting of selectively logged forests with hardwood trees and the creation of multiple use forest buffer zones. Also, enrichment of pastures with legumes and other plants to improve lands, attract wildlife and reduce the need for clear cutting of new pastures by increasing the lifespan of existing pastures. NPC also raises public awareness on the importance of reforestation with native species, as opposed to using exotic trees, by giving special talks.

  • Aims

    Aim 1

    Planting of selectively logged forest

    Activities

    » Planting hardwood trees
    » Creation of multiple use forest buffer zones

    Updates on website and in newsletter. Community demonstrations and talks.


    Aim 2

    Improve lands, attract wildlife, reduce the need for clear cutting of new pasture

    Activities

    » Enrichment of pastures with legume & increase lifespan of existing pastures.

    Research into effects on biodiversity. Publishing of results.


    Aim 3

    Raise public awareness on the importance of reforestation with native species

    Activities

    » Give special talks and poster presentations.

    Updates on website and in newsletter. Community demonstrations and talks. Monitoring and publishing of awareness in schools.


    Aim 4

    Continue to protect and bring back from brink endangered wildlife species

    Activities

    » Create community run reserves to protect major natural biological corridors connecting existing protected areas, ensuring long term habitat protection

    Updates on website and in newsletter. Community demonstrations and talks. Publish results on numbers after carrying out research.


  • Impact

    Impact

    The project will support resources for local communities, improve habitat and help to preserve numbers of fauna and flora. We will continue scientific research in these areas and publish results. Every year we welcome several phd researchers to help collect vital research data for conservation. Many of these go onto publish papers on this research.

    Risk

    Lack of funds. Community disapproval/lack of confidence. We carry out small fundraising projects. The founders of the organisation live within the main community, have a strong community presence and carry out consistent talks in the surrounding areas.

    Reporting

    Regular email updates/newsletters.

  • Budget

    Budget - Project Cost: £5,000

    Loading graph....
      Amount Heading Description
      £1,000 replanting replanting native trees
      £3,000 research volunteer costs, equipment costs
      £1,000 educational workshops going into schools, giving presentations in community
  • Background

    Location

    The Tropical Andes Biodiversity Hotspot is the most biologically diverse region on Earth with about 15,000 endemic plant and 75 endemic mammal species, one of them is the Critically Endangered yellow tailed woolly monkey. It is also one of the most threatened ecosystems in the world due to rapid human population growth and high levels of deforestation. Less than 25% of this hotspot’s original area is still available habitat for wildlife.

    Beneficiaries

    The local communities, flora and fauna, our supporters (in knowing that they are contributing to the survival of species)

  • Why Us?

    Why Us?

    We are proud to be a small charity able to operate with limited resources but with a lot of commitment to the cause. We run dozens of low cost projects which have already proven successful and we use our experiences to globally promote efficient conservation.

    Read more about the Charity running this project.

    People

    Noga Shanee

    Noga co-founded the project in 2007. She lives within the community where the project is based and has a PhD in political ecology.

    Sam Shanee

    Sam co-founded the project in 2007 & is currently joint director of NPC's Yellow Tailed Woolly Monkey Project. He has an Msc in Primate Conservation.

    Brooke Aldrich

    Brooke is an NPC Trustee with an Msc in Primate Conservation, for which she carried out part of her research in Peru.