Project information

Grazing Conservation Project

Lancashire Wildlife Trust is looking for sustainable solutions to land management. We are seeking funding to buy rare breed livestock, for habitat management on our sites. Our aim is to provide a long term solution to reserve management in the North West through traditional grazing methods.

April 2013 - March 2015

Charity information: The Wildlife Trust for Lancashire, Manchester and North Merseyside

The Wildlife Trust for Lancashire, Manchester and North Merseyside logo
  • Need

    Need

    Many habitats are now marginal to current agricultural production and have become degraded through lack of appropriate grazing. The benefits of using animals for habitat management are well proven and the Wildlife Trusts have been leaders in this field.. Grazing animals help manage the land in the most effective and natural way and different stock affect the land in different ways, and it is this natural solution that we are seeking to utilise and promote in our region.

    Solution

    Removing dominant species through grazing allows less competitive species to become established. A more varied habitat (from grazing and from trampling) creates different micro-habitats for invertebrates upon which species of bat depend upon. Bare earth created by trampling allows seeds to set and is beneficial for invertebrates and in turn herptiles. Individual plants benefit and wildflower rich meadows are dependent upon grazing.

  • Aims

    Aim 1

    To acquire Longhorn Cattle to graze Trust reserves in Lancashire.

    Activities

    » Purchase x 12 head of Longhorn Cattle to graze Trust reserves in Lancashire.

    A programme of care and breeding will be in place within 1 year


    Aim 2

    To breed Longhorn Cattle and Hebridean Sheep

    Activities

    » Begin a rare breed breeding programme of Longhorn Cattle and Hebridean Sheep

    It is intended that from the purchase of initial cattle, the project will move to being sustainable in 3-4 years through our breeding programme.


  • Impact

    Impact

    The variation in habitats that can be managed by grazing is considerable from very wet meadows to areas of rush and purple moor grass. Modern breeds of cattle favoured by many farmers for high milk yields are not well suited to conservation grazing. The Lancashire Wildlife Trust proposes to buy Longhorn Cattle, an ancient breed well suited to conservation grazing - there are only between 750 and 1500 breeding female numbers of this beautiful animal in the UK.

    Risk

    Not all sites warrant or are suitable for this approach but as the Lancashire Wildlife Trust takes on larger sites and works towards a Living Landscape approach, the need for grazing and a grazing management capacity within the Trust is increasing. Our recent acquisition of a number of sites has increased our need for grazing considerably if these sites are to be managed with conservation outputs.

    Reporting

    Donors can keep up to date with this project through the Trust’s website or though becoming a member of the Trust and receiving regular mailings and publications. Corporate donors will receive monthly e-newsletters on all project developments.

  • Budget

    Budget - Project Cost: £10,000

    Loading graph....
      Amount Heading Description
      £7,000 Livestock Purchase purchase x12 Longhorn Cattle
      £1,000 Site maintenance Site maintenance
      £1,000 Tools and equipment Tools and equipment
      £1,000 Feed and care Feed and care
  • Background

    Location

    As the Lancashire Wildlife Trust takes on larger sites and works towards a Living Landscape approach, the need for grazing and a grazing management capacity within the Trust is increasing. The recent acquisition of Cut Acre, Lunt Meadows and discussions with Bolton Metro over Smithills Estate will swell our need for grazing considerably by combining with our existing sites of Lightshaw Meadows, Longworth Clough, Freshfield Dune Heaths, and Brockholes.

    Beneficiaries

    A naturally maintained habitat is beneficial primarily for wildlife, but this will have a knock on effect on the surrounding environment by enriching the diversity. This benefits those using the environment or who have an interest in the wildlife that grows as part of the care provided.

  • Why Us?

    Why Us?

    The Wildlife Trust for Lancashire, Manchester and North Merseyside (‘Lancashire Wildlife Trust’) is part of the Wildlife Trusts movement, the UKs leading conservation charity dedicated to all wildlife. Lancashire Wildlife Trust was established in 1962 by a far sighted group of naturalists who understood the risks to the county’s natural heritage. Since then, we have grown to become the leading independent environmental and conservation organisation in the North West.

    Read more about the Charity running this project.

    People

    Sian Parry

    Project Manager and key to ensuring animals are cared for and project outcomes are fulfilled.

Hebridean Sheep

Hebridean Sheep

£600

will pay for another rare breed introduced