Project information

Bring an Orangutan Home in 2015

Hundreds of rescued orphan orangutans are ready to go home to the forest, where they belong. Having undergone years of nurturing rehabilitation under the watchful eyes of the Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation, these graduates need your help to get them home.

November 2012 - December 2016

Charity information: Orangutan Land Trust

Orangutan Land Trust logo
  • Need

    Need

    Over the past 2 decades, hundreds of orphaned and displaced orangutans have been rescued and cared for in sanctuaries such as those operated by Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation in Indonesia. These sanctuaries are now crowded and many of the orangutans are ready for release back to the forest. Finding safe forests for them has been a challenge, but it has been found. Now the only thing preventing them from going home is lack of funding.

    Solution

    Orangutan Land Trust will help support the release of these orangutans by the Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation operating in Indonesia. By releasing orangutans, we can free up space in the rescue centres so they can take in more victims. Additionally, the released orangutans will collectively form a new, viable population in safe areas of forest, ensuring their long-term survival as a species in the wild.

  • Aims

    Aim 1

    Release at least 100 rescued orangutans back to the wild in 2014.

    Activities

    » An integrated team of experts manages the release operation, from selection of candidates and their preparation through to post-release monitoring.

    Success will be demonstrated by the documented release of 100 orangutans complete with at least one year of post-release monitoring.


  • Impact

    Impact

    Eventually a new and viable population of orangutans will be living in a safe area of forest (>250 individuals). Scientists stationed in this forest will monitor the success of the population. The presence of orangutans will help to elevate the protected status of this forest ecosystem. Furthermore, the current bottleneck in the rescue centres will be eliminated, and newly rescued victims can be accepted into the existing facilities. As many as 100 new orangutans can be given sanctuary.

    Risk

    The risk of encroachment into the release area is minimal. It is very inaccessible, thereby minimising interest in this area for timber or agriculture. The few communities that exist in the region have be included in development of the project and have been encouraged to help protect these animals and not hunt them. A field team will also be present to ensure security of the area.

    Reporting

    The Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation produces reports on each release operation and the ongoing monitoring of the orangutans, Orangutan Land Trust will ensure donors receive this information via website, email and/or post.

  • Budget

    Budget - Project Cost: £96,000

    Loading graph....
      Amount Heading Description
      £6,000 Release of one orangutan full cost of operation plus 1 year monitoring
      £6,000 Release of one orangutan full cost of operation plus 1 year monitoring
      £6,000 Release of one orangutan full cost of operation plus 1 year monitoring
      £6,000 Release of one orangutan full cost of operation plus 1 year monitoring
      £6,000 Release of one orangutan full cost of operation plus 1 year monitoring
      £6,000 Release of one orangutan full cost of operation plus 1 year monitoring
      £6,000 Release of one orangutan full cost of operation plus 1 year monitoring
      £6,000 Release of one orangutan full cost of operation plus 1 year monitoring
      £48,000 Release of eight orangutans full cost of operation plus 1 year monitoring
  • Background

    Location

    There are 2 main release areas for the orangutans cared for by the Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation. The first is called Kehje Sewen in East Kalimantan, Indonesia for the release of orangutans from Samboja Lestari Project. The second is in the Murung Raya area of Central Kalimantan for the release of orangutans from the Nyaru Menteng Project.

    Beneficiaries

    The main beneficiary is of course the orangutans themselves. Additionally, local communities benefit from employment.

  • Why Us?

    Why Us?

    Orangutan Land Trust is one of many organisations internationally supporting the expert work of the Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation, which has been rescuing and protecting orangutans since 1991. They are the largest primate rescue operation in the world, caring for over 800 orangutans, and managing hundreds of thousands of hectares of forest for their continued existence.

    Read more about the Charity running this project.

    People

    Lone Droscher-Nielsen

    Lone Droscher-Nielsen founded and managed the BOS Nyaru Menteng Project since 1999, and is now advisor to the Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation.

Release of Terusan

Release of Terusan

After all that has happened to them, these precious orangutans deserve a future in the wild, where they belong.

Michelle Desilets