Project information

How very small babies grow in the womb

This project will investigate how gene therapy can increase the amount of blood reaching the placenta, and subsequently help small babies grow in the womb.

July 2011 - July 2013

Charity information: Wellbeing of Women

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  • Need

    Need

    Fetal growth restriction is a term for a baby who is smaller than normal in the womb. These babies weigh around 90% less than others of the same age. They are at an increased risk of still birth, and if they do survive, they are at an increased risk of brain damage, and other serious long term health problems.

    Solution

    This project will investigate how gene therapy can increase the amount of blood reaching the placenta, and subsequently help these small babies grow in the womb.

  • Aims

    Aim 1

    To investigate how gene therapy can help small babies to grow in the womb.

    Activities

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  • Impact

    Impact

    It is expected that this research will provide important new information on the long-term safety and effectives of gene therapy and how it can help fetal growth restriction. Once the safety of this treatment is established, it is hoped that clinical trials in women will follow, and this will lead to the development of the first effective clinical treatment to help small babies grow in the womb.

    Risk

    We mitigate risk by ensuring that only the best medical research is selected via our Research Advisory Committee and peer review process.

    Reporting

    Our biannual Research Newsletter can be sent out to donors. It updates our supporters on our current research projects and training scholarships.

  • Budget

    Budget - Project Cost: £145,778

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      Amount Heading Description
      £117,606 Salaries (Over 3 years)
      £28,172 Consumables (Over 3 years)
  • Background

    Location

    The project will take place at University College London

    Beneficiaries

    Babies with fetal growth restriction will benefit from this project, as will their families.

  • Why Us?

    Why Us?

    For 50 years we have been funding pioneering medical research that has resulted in some remarkable progress. The work we fund with continue to develop better treatments.

    Read more about the Charity running this project.

    People

    Dr David Carr

    Dr Carr is the lead investigator on this project.

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