Project information

Anne Frank Prisons Project

To deliver in prisons an exhibition and workshop programme, which focuses on contemporary issues of prejudice and discrimination by educating about the life and diary of Anne Frank and the Holocaust. At each exhibition placement we train a number of participants as exhibition guides.

The project is ongoing, with rolling placements of around two weeks at each prison institute.

Charity information: Anne Frank Trust UK

Anne Frank Trust UK logo
  • Need

    Need

    In 2009 there was a 12% rise in reported hate crimes compared to 2008. Inevitably, the attitudes motivating racist and hate-based offending are carried into prisons and YOIs and can increase tensions, which, if not tackled, affect prisoners’ chances of rehabilitation. Indeed there has been a steady rise in alleged racist incidents in prisons. 58% of prisoners interviewed said that they had experienced racism in the previous six months in the prison.

    Solution

    Our project tackles prejudice and discrimination and promotes more positive behaviour amongst prisoners. We help prisoners reflect on and take responsibility for their past actions, achieve formal qualifications through OCN-accredited courses and develop leadership skills through peer education.

  • Aims

    Aim 1

    To breakdown and challenge the social acceptance of racism within the
    prisoner population

    Activities

    » Place exhibition focused on Anne Frank, the Holocaust and contemporary issues of prejudice in 10-12 prison institutions
    » Run debating workshops at each placement on related themes including respect, diversity and personal identity
    » Run training modules and provide education resources for criminal justice sector officers and educators on tackling prejudice and discrimination
    » Recruit exhibition volunteers from across diverse ethnic/religious groups, many of whom would not have worked together previously

    Success will be...evidence of change in attitudes of participants through independent evaluation and increase in reporting of racist incidents across the prison population


    Aim 2

    To increase prisoners' ability to identify prejudiced and discriminatory
    behaviour

    Activities

    » Place exhibition focused on Anne Frank, the Holocaust and contemporary issues of prejudice in 10-12 prison institutions
    » Run debating workshops at each placement on related themes including respect, diversity and personal identity
    » Run creative workshops at each placement, which use Anne’s diary as inspiration for prisoners to express their feelings
    » Based on the principals of restorative justice, at each placement invite a Holocaust survivor/refugee to talk first-hand about their experiences

    Success will be...evidence of change in attitudes of participants taking part throuigh independent evaluation


    Aim 3

    To increase confidence and leadership/communication skills amongst prisoners and young offenders

    Activities

    » Train up to 10 prisoners at each placement as peer educators, presenting the exhibition to other inmates/prison staff
    » Run debating workshops at each placement on related themes including respect, diversity and personal identity

    Success will be...voluntary involvement at each placement for guides and workshop participants and the collation and publication of a portfolio of work from workshops


    Aim 4

    To improve prisoners chances of finding employment or going on to
    further education upon release

    Activities

    » Provide OCN-accredited modules on themes of citizenship and diversity to be administered by teaching staff at each institution

    Success will be...prisoners at each institute going through OCN-accredited courses and prisons taking up these courses as part of their education programmes


  • Impact

    Impact

    Each prison will commit to actively tackling prejudice/discrimination amongst prisoners and staff and delivering relevant education modules. As a result we expect to see an increase in the reporting of racist incidents. Prisons will take up OCN-accredited courses as part of their curriculum. As a result more prisoners will go on to positive destinations upon release. We will demonstrate these long term changes by conducting in-depth evaluations with prison psychologists at a sample of prisons.

    Risk

    Part of our funding for the Prisons Project comes from prisons hiring exhibitions (on average £3,500 at each prison institution). Because of the current cuts to prison spending, this funding is under threat.

    Reporting

    We will provide a quarterly monitoring report, which will collate progress on project targets and outcomes (inc. results from in-depth evaluation), baseline monitoring info. on participants, feedback from each prison and changes to the project. We will also invite donors to visit the project.

  • Budget

    Budget - Project Cost: £73,087

    Loading graph....
      Amount Heading Description
      £11,759 Direct costs Education resources / materials for ten prisons & transportation of exhibition, plus evaluation
      £61,328 Salaries Prison project manager and freelance delivery staff salaries inc. accomodation and subsistence
  • Background

    Location

    The project takes place nationally. In 2010 we visited YOIs and prisons in Rochester, Bicester, Derbyshire, Stoke On Trent, Kent, Leicestershire, Milton Keynes, New Market, Cambridgeshire, Suffolk and Wakefield.

    Beneficiaries

    Our project benefits prisoners, prison staff and young and juvenile offenders from across the prison population. We work with prisoners from open Category D prisons through to lifers in high-security Category A prisons. We will continue to work with Young Offenders Institutes and plan to extend our work to Prison Referral Units. We also plan to extend this project into the probation service.

  • Why Us?

    Why Us?

    The Anne Frank Trust UK Prison Project was founded in 2003 in response to growing concern about racism and prejudice in prisons. In 2010 we worked in 17 prison institutions across the UK, including five institutions for young offenders. Over 3,750 prisoners have visited our exhibition or taken part in a workshop and over 100 prisoners were trained as exhibition guides. Our work has had an exceptional response, with 84.7% of offenders saying it has made them more likely to challenge prejudice.

    Read more about the Charity running this project.

    People

    Steve Gadd - Prison Project Manager

    Steve joined the Anne Frank Trust in 2004. He manages and delivers the Prisons Project, and has taken the programme to all categories of prison.

    Unity Sandasi - Prison Project Officer

    Unity promotes and markets the Prisons Project to prisons. She joined the Trust in 2009, after taking part in the project whilst in prison.

    Leah Thorn - Workshop Facilitator

    Leah is an acclaimed spoken word poet. She facilitates poetry workshops, poems from which have won the Koestler Awards.